Wild Tier List & Decks Roundup

By Spike, Regular Contributor, Wild Legend

Well, here we go. I’ve rounded up over a hundred different decks that see decent amounts of play in Wild- there are some meme decks, but they’re fairly popular ones.

The tier list is based off of a mix of publicly available data and my own opinion. It should reflect the meta fairly well, and includes many more decks than most published Wild tier lists. Decks that have distinct variants that differ by more than a card or two- such as Discolock having a popular list that runs a Darkglare package and one that doesn’t- are counted separately.

Again, all placements are based off of publicly available data such as HSReplay and Tempo Storm’s Wild Meta Snapshot, as well as my own experiences and opinions. You, reader, probably won’t agree with me on everything. You probably won’t agree with every card in every list, every placement, maybe not even on if a deck exists or not. That’s fine. I did my best to reflect the current meta (this is the first draft, posted May or early June, 2021), not public opinion. Likewise, apologies if a deck isn’t on there- I did my best to round up meta and off-meta decks that are at least somewhat popular. Wild has approximately 5 billion, 828 million, 028 thousand, 384 different decks. I’m sure I missed a couple.

What does everything on the tier list mean?

The tier list is set up somewhat oddly- each tier is lettered, as opposed to the traditional numbered tiers most Hearthstone tier lists use. It’s a lot of decks, and I wanted to separate them more distinctly than number tiers allow. S/A+/A/A- looks a lot cleaner than Tier 1, Tier 1.25, Tier 1.5, Tier 1.75. Under the main tier list, there’s a second tier list for decks that have potential to become meta (fairly strong, popular decks that aren’t quite popular enough to be “meta”, as well as less common variants of meta decks). On top of that, there’s another for off meta decks that are somewhat popular, yet another for fully off-meta decks that still see decent amounts of play, and a short list of meme decks. I’m sorry if that’s hard to navigate- there’re over a hundred decks ranging from meta decks to memes and everything in between, I had to separate them out somehow.

I didn’t want to rank the off-meta and meme decks that aren’t yet popular, decks that don’t have a solid archetype nailed down, purely meme-y decks or decks that are just starting to establish themselves (looking at you, Floodlock and Deathrattle Priest) alongside established meta decks. Some of these off-meta decks are still viable and are marked as such, along with what tier I think they’ve got potential to hit. As for the “meta” decks- they’re all fairly established and somewhat popular, generally either because they’ve been around a long time or Blizzard pushed them.

Each deck has a few little blurbs alongside it. One has other common names for the deck, so you can just ctrl f search for decks if you’re looking for a specific one. There should also be a relative popularity measure next to most decks on the regular tier list, so you know somewhat how often to expect to run into them. This is not based on hard stats and is based off of Platinum through ~800 Legend, so it excludes the homebrews down in Gold and below and the weird mix of off-meta and top tier that is higher Legend. There’s also, just for fun, a little superlative for some of them tossed in with alternate names. You can tell it apart from alt names because it’s generally too long to be a name, and because it’s (hopefully) somewhere in the realm of even attempting to be funny. Also, italics. There should at some point be a relative difficulty level alongside each deck, but again, I’m one guy doing all of this solo, so… yeah, that got backburnered.

For the slightly off-meta decks that are found directly below the meta tier list, they have a little number/letter combination beside them. If you look at the number, that corresponds to the deck on the main tier list I think it’s roughly equal in strength to- the letter is just there to distinguish if I think multiple are about that strength.

Decks also have a link to one of three things- a decklist and basic overview, a simple guide that doesn’t include much besides some analysis and card substitutions, or a full guide with all of that plus mulligans and some basic matchup advice. I’m a one-person Hearthstone writing team, so don’t expect very many decks to get full guides. Not every deck is even going to have a list linked in the early updates, but the majority of popular meta decks should. This stuff is linked on a separate page to make it easier to navigate the tier list.

Each deck should, at some point, have a short blurb under it on the main tier list giving some basic information on the deck. When a decklist is put up, the blurb should be expanded to include background on the deck’s rise to viability, a bit of playstyle analysis, and the like.

Decklists are, for the most part, made by me breaking down popular lists, finding the core cards, and then creating a list very similar to the meta lists that I think works best. Some of the time, that means looking at cases where the deck has hit high Legend and swapping out the less essential cards to what I think is best. Some are simply popular meta lists, some are my lists that have been created from scratch (mainly for off-meta decks where there isn’t much data on them other than what my deck tracker has seen from opponents), and a few are lists from various players and streamers- they’ve been credited. Again, I’m sorry that they’re linked on separate pages, but I wanted to make it easier to read this monster of an article.

Keep in mind that this tier list was put together via data I can access and my opinions on decks. I suppose I’m sorry if you disagree, but hey, go make your own 120+ deck Wild Tier List from scratch that every Wild player can agree with on every point… oh, right. Never going to happen.

Whew. That was long. I wanted to get all the how to navigate stuff out of the way early so it would be obvious how to find whatever you’re looking for here, but that has… backfired? Anyways, now for the tier list! It is ordered, at least in the higher tiers. Towards the bottom it all blends together. Hopefully, if future me doesn’t forget, there’ll be an easier navigation set up to find certain decks, but he probably will, the lazy bum.

Wild Tier List, July 2021

This tier list is for the meta directly after the Gibberling, Apotheosis, and Renew nerfs.

If you’re wondering about the new site or why this Wild Tier List isn’t the Comprehensive that gave me a niche in the Hearthstone writing world- check out my article on What’s Up With Surgeon of the Cards and the Comprehensive Wild Meta Tier List?

The tier list is based off of a mix of publicly available data and my own opinion. It should reflect the meta fairly well, and includes more decks than most published Wild tier lists. Decks that have distinct variants that differ by more than a card or two- such as Discolock having a popular list that runs a Darkglare package and one that doesn’t- are counted separately.

Again, all placements are based off of publicly available data such as HSReplay and Tempo Storm’s Wild Meta Snapshot, as well as my own experiences and opinions. You, reader, probably won’t agree with me on everything. You probably won’t agree with every card in every list, every placement, nor every card in a list. That’s fine. I did my best to reflect the current meta, not public opinion. Likewise, apologies if a deck isn’t on there- I did my best to round up meta decks that are at least somewhat popular. Wild has approximately 5 billion, 828 million, 328 thousand, 384 different decks. I’m sure I missed a couple.

Unlike the Comprehensive Wild Meta Tier List, which is currently being worked on, this list contains “only” 35 of the more popular meta decks. Once the Comprehensive is released, it will contain somewhere around 150 decks.

The Comprehensive is set up weirdly, but the Meta list can be read like any other tier list! Each deck is in a tier, with Tier 0 for any indisputed top deck, Tier 1 for the best decks, Tier 2 for the slightly worse decks, and so on. I use tiers such as Tier 1.5 as well to reflect when decks are not quite good enough to make the cut.

Each deck is in a numbered list from strongest to weakest (for example, the best deck is at 1, the second best at 2, and so on). The name of the deck along with other names for it is listed, and then there’s a link to one of three things- a list, which is just the decklist, an overview, which generally contains the list, card substitutions, and a brief look at the deck, or an in-depth guide. There’s then a little blurb that explains the deck somewhat.

Decklists are, for the most part, made by me breaking down popular lists, finding the core cards, and then creating a list very similar to the meta lists that I think works best. Some of the time, that means looking at cases where the deck has hit high Legend and swapping out the less essential cards to what I think is best. Some are simply popular meta lists, some are my lists that have been created from scratch (mainly for off-meta decks where there isn’t much data on them other than what my deck tracker has seen from opponents), and a few are lists directly from various players and streamers- they’ve been credited.

Anyways, now to the list!

Tier 1- These are the best decks in the meta, capable of climbing both on the way to and in Legend. They are, for the most part, highly consistent and have good matchups across the board. I don’t recommend using Painlock to climb to Legend, though, as the lower ranks are full of Aggro and Secret Mages that will burst you down.

  1. Painlock (Giant Warlock/Glarelock/Darkglare Warlock)- List and Overview

Painlock is an archetype that popped up in Scholomance Academy and has only gotten stronger in Forged In the Barrens due to the new Legendary Tamsin Roame and the change to Drain Soul that has made it a carbon copy of Penance, one of the strongest single target damage Spells in the game. Despite the nerf to Pen Flinger, often used due to the ability to damage your own face with it and repeat that, the deck is still highly consistent and strong. After damaging face enough, often playing large numbers of cards due to Darkglare refreshing mana whenever your Hero takes damage during your turn, the deck drops Flesh Giants and Molten Giants, sometimes buffs them, and aims to finish the game the turn after. It’s not easy to play due to the need to manage Health carefully, and has a distinct weakness to any deck that can burst it down when it’s vulnerable. That includes meta titans such as Secret Mage, so you’re unlikely to see this deck often, especially after the Pen Flinger nerf, unless you find a high ranked pocket meta.

2. Secret Mage (formerly Aluneth Mage)- In-depth Guide

The guide was originally written during Darkmoon (yes, it’s been updated), but the deck hasn’t changed much aside from the meta getting better while it didn’t. The new Secret, Oasis Allies, is basically a slightly more consistent Netherwind Portal. It’s bad! Yay! On a more serious note, the deck is relatively simple to play and fairly cheap (depending on the list, up to 5 copies of Epics, of which only 2 are essential and 1 Legendary). You use your Secret cheapeners to put Secrets into play, wreck your opponent’s gameplan, and finish off by burning their face. You have both Secret tutors in Arcanologist, Mad Scientist, and Ancient Mysteries as well as straight out draw in Rigged Faire Game and Sayge/Aluneth (Sayge is better and more popular, but Aluneth works fine). On top of that, you have disruption from Counterspell and Explosive Runes, plus AoE, one sided board clears from Arcane Flakmage and Flame Ward. The deck is a super consistent machine, and you’ll see a ton of it. Though you’re unlikely to hold onto that sweet 70% winrate while climbing past Platinum, it’s possible to play the deck in a fairly braindead manner and still do well. Since it’s cheap on top of being strong even when played suboptimally, it’s incredibly popular and has been since Cloud Prince and Arcane Flakmage got printed. Some of the players who were playing it just for its strength have shifted to other decks, so you won’t see it half your games in Platinum like you would have last expansion, but it’s still all over the place.

3. Raza Priest (Highlander Priest/Reno Priest/Machine Gun Priest)- List and Overview

Raza Priest is a Highlander deck that runs the typical Reno/Kazakus/Zephyrs package, but also has a 2 card combo in Raza the Chained and Shadowreaper Anduin that allows you to ping for 2 damage, for free, every time you play a card, which functions as the finisher that Highlander decks often need. You’re probably going to see it constantly in every rank above Gold. It’s popular, it’s been around a while, and it’s constantly been top tier since Raza the Chained was unchained (it was nerfed from HP cost 0 to cost 1, then unnerfed). It’s as strong as either Highlander or Control gets in Wild, so fans of either gravitate towards it. It’s top tier, it’s consistent (as compared to Painlock or Flamewaker Mage), it’s fairly cheap (not counting the Reno/Kazakus/Zephyrs package, which sees play in several decks), with only 2 Legendaries and 1 Epic that don’t see much play elsewhere, and thus- it’s super popular and it’s everywhere. For better or worse, it’s EVERYWHERE. Cue PTSD flashbacks.

Tier 1.5- Mainly strong, consistent decks that don’t have quite as much consistency or have a worse matchup spread than the top decks, mainly due to glaring weaknesses. In all honesty, these are some of the best climb options, as they’re all faster than the top decks, even though they pull lower winrates.

4. Odd Paladin (Odd Pally)- List and Overview

Odd Paladin takes advantage of Baku the Mooneater upgrading Paladin’s Hero Power to flood the board with Silver Hand Recruits and then buff them, often two or three turns in a row. It’s very strong in the current meta due to its ability to quickly and consistently end games before the opponent gets rolling, but because most Paladin players swapped over to Handbuff Pally (and the difficult Secret Mage and Flamewaker Mage matchups), it’s not as popular right now as usual. However, after the fall of Flamewaker Mage from top tier to mediocracy, as well as better meta positioning and nerfs to Handbuff Pally, the old titan is steadily retaking its throne.

5. Pirate Warrior- List and Overview

Pirate Warrior is a straightforward deck that capitalizes on Pirate synergies such as Patches and Parachute Brigand being summoned and Ship’s Cannon/Skybarge dealing damage to set up a large board and go face repeatedly. It also runs Ancharrr and Outrider’s Axe for even more damage and draw purposes, as wella s some sort of Charge minion as a closer. Forged In the Barrens and the Core Set have given it a new board control tool in the form of Fogsail Flybooter, draw and damage in Outrider’s Axe, and a buff in Rokara, and that’s led to the deck’s comfortable top spot. The ease of simply curving out and not doing too much beyond that being viable is interesting in the deck, but being able to do amazing after some learning and skill is applied have led to the deck being one of the most popular Tribe-focused decks in recent memory. Murloc Shaman one-upped it, though.

While it could be easily argued that decks such as Spellsbane Rogue and Murloc Shaman are stronger, Pirate Warrior is a lot more consistent and has more options than those decks, so it gets a slightly higher spot.

6. Spellsbane Rogue (Kingsbane Rogue)- List and Overview

This is my personal favorite version of Kingsbane (there are 4 in the Comprehensive Wild Meta Tier List if memory serves- Flingsbane Midrange, Nitroboost, Pirate and Spellsbane), and right now I believe the strongest. It’s a fairly typical Kingsbane deck that looks to finish the opponent with burn from Wicked Stab if it can’t finish with of board or Kingsbane itself.

After the Nitroboost nerf, Kingsbane has been sent reeling and split into several variants. After the Pen Flinger nerf, that got even worse, and with the printing of Fogsail Flybooter and unnerf of Blade Flurry, everything is thoroughly insane. The meta currently favors Kingsbane Rogue more than it did directly after the nerf, so Kingsbane is simply a solid deck. Nothing insane like pre-Nitroboost nerf, but it can be built several different ways.

7. Mozaki Mage- List and Overview

Mozaki Mage is, for all intents and purposes, now a better Flamewaker. The deck revolves around the same idea- cheapen Spells, play a bunch in one turn, kill opponent- but needs the minion Mozaki, Master Duelist in play and finishes the opponent with burn from some mix of Frostbolt, Ice Lance and Runed Orb.

Unfortunately, the deck can’t afford to be as flexible with its combo pieces. It also only has one Mozaki, and relies on Taelan for drawing it, but Taelan is relatively slow. Due to being slower, the deck relies on 2 copies of Ice Block, 2 copies of Ancient Mysteries to draw it, and 2 copies of Frost Nova to stall. If you have Mozaki it’s a pretty cheap and strong option. Despite that, Mozaki is not especially popular. Expect to see it somewhat often, but to see Flamewaker Mage a lot more at lower ranks- and to tell Waker Mage and Mozaki Mage apart, if it plays Ancient Mysteries or Frost Nova that aren’t randomly generated, it’s likely Mozaki Mage. If it runs Stargazer Luna or Primordial Glyph, it’s probably Flamewaker.

The In-Betweens (Not quite good enough to be Tier 1.5, but not far enough behind to be Tier 2)

8. Murloc Shaman- List and Overview

Murloc Shaman was pushed hard in Forged In the Barrens, which is awesome. It’s a really fun archetype- that is, in Standard.

In Wild, Murlocs have hit critical mass. Between early game powerhouses like Murloc Tidecaller, Murmy, and the new Spawnpool Forager (better Murmy), the resource generation of Underbelly Angler, finishers like Nofin Can Stop Us and Everyfin Is Awesome, and the new Firemancer Flurgl/Toxfin 2 card, 3 mana, one sided board wipe, the deck is ridiculously strong and snowballs quickly. If the opponent is unable or unwilling to deal with the early board, this deck can close games by turn 6 or 7 at MOST. That, combined with the straightforward play cards-buff cards playstyle and low Dust cost have made the deck incredibly popular. You can expect 60+% of matches against Shaman to be Murloc Shamans, and 10-15% overall. The deck is even more popular in high Platinum, from what I can tell.

No, the Crabrider nerf was not a huge blow (Crabrider went from a mediocre card to a slightly more mediocre card), and yes, Crabrider is still good in the deck. Immediate removal Murlocs that have enough Health to wait a turn or two to be buffed are good in Murloc decks, simple enough.

9. Galakrond Shaman (Shudderwock Shaman)- List and Overview

A relatively new archetype due to the new Wailing Vapor and Primal Dungeoneer introduced in the Wailing Caverns mini-set, as well as the nerf reversions to the Galakrond Shaman package, Galakrond Shaman has recently exploded into prominence. Due to the Elemental package, Galakrond Shaman has both agressive options such as Wailing Vapor, Earthen Might, the Cagematch Custodian/Whack-A-Gnoll Hammer duo and Arid Stormer, as well as stall options such as Lilypad Lurker and Earth Revenant. Combined with Galakrond Shaman’s already solid stall package, the Ice Fishing/Toxfin/Firemancer Flurgl package and the big payoffs in Galakrond, Kronx Dragonhoof and Shudderwock, the aggressive package and draw from Primal Dungeoneer makes Galakrond Shaman a highly versatile monster, and the only deck to crack the top 10 off of its sheer variety of options.

10. Discolock (no Pain package)- List and Overview

Though the Pain version is also strong and popular, this version is more popular and easier to play. Discolock relies on outspeeding its competition, and while the small Darkglare package allows it to do that in a faster manner, normal Discolock can make a mid-game resurgence, and due to a couple popular decks right now (I blame Warlock for hating itself… Renolock and Control Warlock each have a Tickatus and a Big Demon version, and both are horrible to face as Aggro) speed is key.

This list is very much viable, especially in lower ranks (I often start my run through Gold with it because it allows me to rack up a few quick wins back-to-back on a large star bonus, and I’ve reached numbers as crazy as 20-0 with the deck while climbing in past expansions), and still a very good option for preying on midrange decks. Plus, it’s one of the cheapest meta decks in Wild- the entire thing can be built for under 3.5K Dust, and you can cut the cost down even farther.

Tier 2- Relatively strong decks that can still climb well, but aren’t quite consistent enough in their matchup spreads to be great.

11. Big Demon Renolock (Reno Warlock/Highlander Warlock)- List and Overview

Due to the nature of Kazakus and Reno Jackson being primarily defensive, most Reno decks follow a defensive pattern, and Reno Warlock is no exception. With a bevy of early game defensive tools and a package of Voidcaller and Archwitch Willow alongside big Demons as a finisher, Renolock with Big Demons is about as simple a fit to that pattern as possible. Note- the deck is incredibly expensive, 20K+ Dust if you don’t have the cards yet. It sees a bit more play than the Tickatus version, but isn’t especially common. You’ll almost certainly see it once you get to high Platinum if nothing else, though. This particular list also runs a few techs- there are card substitutions in the overview.

12. Discolock with Pain package- List and Overview

Discolock was a meme for a while. Blizzard would print Discard synergies, fail to print enough, and the deck would flop. Eventually, those synergies hit critical mass in Wild, and Discolock popped up. The deck runs Flame Imp, Kobold Librarian, and of course the Hero Power already, so at some point someone went “hey, what if Raise Dead and Darkglare got tossed in, so your early boards are even more ridiculously absurd?” Bam, Discolock with Pain package was born.

Functionally, it may as well be Discolock with more early game focus. Take advantage of Discard to put bodies on board and draw, finish with Doomguard or a buff from Wicked Whispers. The notable difference is that Darkglare allows an extremely good early game if the draws align, but you sacrifice some mid-game power (usually Felstalker and Fist of Jaraxxus) to do so.

13. Handbuff Paladin- List and Overview

Based around using cards such as Glowstone Technician, Grimestreet Outfitter, and Smuggler’s Run to make every minion played a hugely overstatted one, this former meta tyrant runs several Charge and Rush minions alongside yet more buffs to ensure games can be ended by just one or two minions. With targeted draw from Salhet’s Pride and Knight of Anointment, the deck does so consistently, cementing its spot at number one. Despite being so strong, it has a very different playstyle from most decks and a steep learning curve (plus, it’s a fairly new deck to the meta, compounding both of those), so you’ll see it fairly commonly at higher ranks, but nowhere near as much as Waker Mage, Secret Mage, Painlock, and Raza Priest. After nerfs to Hand of Ad’al and First Day of School, it’s still a good deck, but nowhere near its previous dominance.

14. Tickatus Renolock (Reno Warlock/Highlander Ticklock)- List and Overview

This is one of those weird instances where changing a secondary win condition hurts a deck’s viability quite a bit. If you’re going to be as greedy as Wild Renolock is, you better have something to show for it- and all the stats point to Tickatus not being quite enough to surpass Big Demons. Though the deck is still strong and viable, you’re better off with the simpler Big Demon version.

The In-Betweens 2- Though still viable ladder choices, these decks are on the edge between “good” and “okay”.

15. Big Priest (Res Priest)- List and Overview

Big Priest is a deck built around the card Shadow Essence, using it to summon powerful minions early that usually summon more minions, before resurrecting any that die repeatedly. It’s about as straightforward as a Priest deck gets. It’s not very difficult to play normally nor expensive, but it takes a lot of skill to pilot if you don’t get a good mulligan- and it’s a huge uphill battle if you don’t get an early Shadow Essence. Due to that, the majority of players gravitate towards more consistent decks such as Raza Priest.

If not for the Renew nerf, I’d have Renew in the decklist and this deck near the top of Tier 2. However, losing that early game healing is a much worse blow than it seems, and any randomly generated Apotheoses are worse too. Essentially, the deck’s healing in general took a big hit, and that matters a lot in the current aggressive meta.

16. Aggro Odd Demon Hunter (Odd DH)- List and Overview

Hyper aggressive SMORC incarnate. That is Aggro Odd DH.

It’s simpler than the Deathrattle package version, but in the current meta, the extra damage it brings at the cost of consistency goes a long way. It gets outspeeded and outboarded by a lot of other Aggro, but has an exceedingly easy time against Painlock and Discolock with the Pain package, so if you find a pocket meta, take advantage.

17. Cutelock (Floodlock, 0-cost Warlock)- List and Overview

Cutelock was a stroke of genius. Though it saw meme play before the expansion, the printing of Ritual of Doom and large amounts of success from a few players saw it shoot up in popularity. It revolves around filling and buffing an early board, then killing the opponent by turn 5 at the latest. If the opponent can deal with the early board, it folds.

18. Aggro Even Hunter- List and Overview

The Secret based list is almost assuredly better. You can find it in the list of decks here. It’s unpopular for some reason, probably because this one’s way easier to play and faster- but this one isn’t going to beat Aggro decks as easily, and its matchup spread is a lot more polarized.

It’s a pretty easy deck to understand- play aggressively while you hit Hero Power to whittle down the opponent every other turn. It’s also pretty fun for an Aggro deck, because- gasp- it actually trades off minions. I have seen some lists that just go cowabunga and full Aggro their way through, though.

19. Aggro Shaman (Elemental Shaman)- List and Overview

Aggro Shaman is yet another Shaman deck born from the Forged In the Barrens Elementals as well as Wailing Vapor and Primal Dungeoneer from the Wailing Caverns mini-set. Unlike Galakrond Shaman, it takes advantage of Shaman’s strong Wild Overload package and aggressive Elementals to rush down the opponent within the first few turns, topping its curve at 3 mana.

It’s a very cool cross between Burn Shaman and the curve-based Elemental Shaman that also popped up, and it’s exceedingly cheap, running only 6 Rares, no Epics, and no Legendaries. That’s incredibly cheap for Wild meta decks, and you’ll probably never see a cheaper one.

Tier 2.5- Mainly decks that are strong, yet have highly linear gameplans that lead to losses to particular game states. For example, DR Odd DH loses if it runs out of steam against midrange, RPG Mage has issues with decks that are efficient enough to dodge its early removal and then kill it in mid-game, and Odd Rogue has really bad issues with Control decks.

20. Odd DH w/Deathrattle package (DR Odd DH)- List and Overview

After Arcane Golem was unnerfed, Odd DH rejoiced for the extra reach. After Bad Luck Albatross was unnerfed, Odd DH rejoiced for the sweet Deathrattle on an aggressive body. After Leper Gnome was unnerfed, Odd DH rejoiced for extra reach from a sweet Deathrattle on an aggressive body.

Now that Tuskpiercer exists, Odd DH can draw both Albatross and Leper Gnome more easily. On top of that, it’s a 1/2 Weapon for 1 mana (about as good as a 1 mana Weapon gets), so it triggers Battlefiend even if you can’t Hero Power that turn. Seriously, a 1 mana 1/2 Weapon that tutors a good card is awesome. Since DH is in a bad position in Wild due to the lack of cards compared to other classes, Odd DH is basically the only truly viable archetype, and the small Deathrattle package is awesome. Though a little more reach from burn is better right now, DR Odd DH is still quite viable.

21. Pirate Kingsbane Rogue- List and Overview

Another version of Kingsbane, this one has a lower skill floor and a lower skill ceiling. You can easily pick this one up, but you won’t get as much mileage as if you choose to master Spellsbane. As much as I like being able to mix Pirate Rogue and Kingsbane Rogue, it leads to a rather awkward middle ground where you don’t consistently stay on board but don’t consistently buff up Kingsbane enough to win, either.

I piloted a variation of this to Legend, but then the nerf to Nitroboost happened. This particular list eschews Nitroboost in favor of a more consistent Pirate package. As an upside, it can build a board much more easily than Spellsbane or any other variant of Kingsbane, and has a possible board clear in Ship’s Cannon, but it suffers from a lack of reach. It’s a fun and totally viable variation of Kingsbane, though, so feel free to try it out.

22. RPG Mage (Reno Mage, Highlander Mage, Reno’s Pocket Galaxy, LPG Mage, Galaxy Mage)- List and Overview

RPG Mage is the latest and greatest form of Highlander Mage. Based around the usual Highlander gameplan of stalling until a big win condition goes down, RPG Mage’s win condition is Luna’s Pocket Galaxy and a bunch of big minions. Running a Dragon package allows for the activation of Malygos, Aspect of Magic and Dragoncaster, and Dragoncaster as well as Tortollan Pilgrim allow the cheating out of Luna’s Pocket Galaxy.

Unfortunately, between the Dragon/Dragoncaster, Highlander, and Turtle/LPG packages, the deck doesn’t have enough room for lots of early removal. It has enough stall to sometimes contend with Aggro and Midrange, but Flame Ward, a nice Kazakus creation and Explosive Sheep are the only real AoE removals in the list and its single target removal capabilities are limited. Though it’s only matched in the late game by the likes of Big Priest, Big Demon decks and Combos, getting there is the hard part and leads to this deck being rather low on the tier list.

The list I’ve featured runs a few weird cards- Astromancer Solarian and Explosive Sheep, for example, there are more ways to build Galaxy Mage than stars in the sky. You’ll have to experiment to find your favorite, and there’s a long list of card substitutions in the overview.

23. Aggro Paladin (Rallydin)- List and Overview

Essentially the new Tax Paladin, Aggro Paladin is much the same model. Play aggressive cheap minions, Call To Arms to put them in to play, and a small Secret package as well as buffs to kill the opponent ASAP. Unfortunately, losing Crabrider as an option, as well as nerfs to Hand of Ad’al and Far Watch Post killed Tax Paladin, and Aggro Paladin hasn’t done that much better.

24. Reno Shaman (Reno Shudderwock Shaman)- List and Overview

Reno Shaman has recently risen to prominence in a new fashion, using Shudderwock as an all-in-one win condition. With Grumble, Worldshaker, Barista Lynchen, and Zola the Gorgon, you can get the traditional repeating uses of Shudderwock, but the deck runs plenty of disruption and removal Battlecries, and can use Shudderwock to Zephyrs and heal to full with Reno repeatedly.

The deck runs Ice Fishing, alongside the new Firemancer Flurgl/Toxfin combo for a guaranteed 3 mana, 2 card destroy all opposing minions without Divine Shield. It’s a pretty good combo that plays into the deck’s modus operandi of stalling until it can use Shudderwock.

Removal and disruption spells such as Hex, Lightning Storm, Tidal Surge, Plague of Murlocs, Devolving Missiles and Devolve allow the deck to stall even more. However, the deck has a hard time if opponents can repeatedly refill board, and it doesn’t do much proactive play until the late game, so it’s lower on the tier list.

25. Odd Rogue- List and Overview

I’ve provided two variations on Odd Rogue in my Wild Decks, Lists, and Guides page. This one is the one you’ll see 95% of the time on ladder, while the other is a more experimental Field Contact version that has a bit more potential.

This variation is the same as ever- repeatedly attack with big knife, plus some synergies. The Nitroboost nerf destroyed any hope of top tier for Odd Rogue and most players abandoned it, but it’s still somewhat of a solid choice on ladder.

This version has an advantage over the Field Contact one in that it’s slightly more aggressive. However, unlike the Field Contact one, it rolls over if it runs out of steam.

Tier 3- Three decks that were nerfed out of higher tiers but still stuck around, and one that’s awesome but also a bit slow for Wild.

26. Aggro Druid (Hyperaggro Druid)- List and Overview

This is possibly the fastest deck in Wild, often winning games by Turn 4. It’s absolutely ridiculous when it works, but it also dies pretty spectacularly to any opponents who can clear the initial board or two, so it’s not the most consistent. Despite that, its ability to quickly win games and good matchups against slightly slower Aggro decks such as Odd Paladin or Pirate Warrior make it an incredibly popular choice at lower ranks, though it falls off in both popularity and strength in higher ranks due to the large numbers of Warlocks (both Reno and Control are uphill battles) and Priests (Raza and Big can both absolutely destroy the deck) in the hands of stronger players.

Unfortunately, the Gibberling nerf has pretty much knocked the deck from any hope of being top tier like it was a year or so ago with the release of Scholomance Academy.

27. Flamewaker Mage (APM Mage, Waker Mage)- List and Overview

The Refreshing Spring Water nerf knocked this deck from contention, flat out. Its similar cousin Mozaki Mage outstripped it, and Wild players everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

That said, it’s still okay on ladder, feeding on greedy decks. It’s still entirely capable of a Turn 5 30-to-death kill with Flamewakers, but it’s got less options should it run out of steam.

28. Celestial Malygos Druid (Celestial Druid, Alignment Druid)- List and Overview

Recently piloted to #1 Legend by Hijo, the Celestial Alignment variation of Malygos Druid is more consistent than ever. After playing Celestial Alignment, the deck ramps and plays out a combo turn with Malygos+Germination, Ultimate Infestation, Swipe, and occasionally the older combo with Germination and Forest Warden Omu to finish the game in one turn.

However, it’s also slow, and the Alignment setup leaves less room for stall tools than the deck would like, leaving it a mediocre option. It tales a while to finish games and loses to a lot of midrange and aggro decks that are faster than it, so I can’t recommend it for general ladder.

29. Token Druid (Gibberling Druid)- List and Overview

The existence of this deck can be directly attributed to 2 5-cost Druid spells printed recently- Glowfly Swarm that allowed for a Token Druid deck to exist, and Arbor Up that made it viable. However, to say that those are the big new deal in the deck would be wrong- of the 15 unique cards in the deck, nine were printed within the past couple years.

The deck is so cheap (under 4K Dust) and contains so many cards from Standard Token Druid (about half the deck) and Wild Aggro Druid (about a third of the deck) that at its peak, it was just as common as (and stronger than) Aggro Druid. However, Aggro Druid is now better due to the meta shifting, and Token Druid is basically gone. It’s still a solid option, and, in my opinion, the most consistent Druid deck in Wild, though.

The Gibberling nerf hit Token Druid even harder than Aggro. It’s now way less capable of doing anything proactive early, and has to stall against other Aggro until Turn 4-5.

Tier 3.5- Every deck here works, but every deck here also has glaring weaknesses or an exceedingly slow win condition.

30. DMH Warrior (Dead Man’s Hand)- List and Overview

DMH Warrior is an old and mildly stupid Control deck that aims to outvalue the opponent. The namesake card, Dead Man’s Hand, is a 2 mana spell that shuffles a copy of your hand into your deck. Given that the deck runs a ton of tools for Armor gain and stall, and yes, you can shuffle a copy of your other DMH as well to go infinite, that’s the whole idea- it’s essentially a weird Control Warrior with a fatigue win condition.

I’m tempted to say run Odd Warrior if you really want to play Control Warrior, but I never want to recommend Odd Warrior, and it may be slightly weaker right now. Perhaps try Galakrond, Menagerie or Rush Warrior instead?

31. Jade Druid (Big Green Men)- List and Overview

Jade Druid is a very old archetype that exists mainly due to Jade Idol, which allows for a steady stream of big green men while preventing fatigue. The current lists also run a lot of late-game bombs such as Ultimate Infestation, Ysera Unleashed, and Yogg-Saron, Hope’s End to close out the game.

Unfortunately, though its Armor gain is impressive and its Fatigue immunity makes it one of the best decks for grindy matchups out there, Jade Druid is pretty slow. It has a lot of issues with faster decks despite the amount of removal it runs, and decks such as Secret Mage or Handbuff Paladin can outvalue it in the mid-game and kill it before it gets going.

That said, if you enjoy slower decks, Jade Druid is viable, and can be a both fun and challenging deck to play.

32. Mill Rogue (Coldlight Rogue)- List and Overview

Mill Rogue is a deck that looks to bounce Coldlight Oracle repeatedly and shuffle copies into deck to mill the opponent to death. It doesn’t always work, but when it does it’s pretty crazy. Due to how crazy and satisfying it is to pop off with the deck, it’s always been more popular than its strength and Dust cost would warrant. It’s one of the few viable mill decks, the others being the likes of DMH Warrior with Coldlights, so that’s pretty interesting and draws players to it.

Unfortunately, the deck has a really bad issue with consistency- if it can’t get a Coldlight before the opponent pops off, it’s probably going to die. It also does atrocious against decks such as Odd Warrior or slower Druids that can just Armor past what Mill Rogue can deal with Mill, but those are fairly rare cases anyways.

33. Beast Hunter- List and Overview

Beast Hunter is a hyperaggro deck that aims to uses synergizing Beasts to flood the board and bring the opponent down swiftly. It’s basically Cutelock, but slower in the early game and with draw options.

Master’s Call and Starving Buzzard both make for amazing draw, while Don’t Feed the Animals is, once Corrupted, the source of threat after threat. However, the deck has some issues with being too weak in the early game, and it’s not especially strong due to that. After the Starving Buzzard nerf revert, it seems players are okay with trying it out, and despite its weaknesses it remains relatively popular. It’s also cheap, and can be built for around 3K Dust.

Tier 4- Popular decks, lacking in the strength department. Maly Druid is slow, Odd Warrior essentially has no win condition besides forcing the opponent to fatigue or concede, and Quest Rogue is overreliant on getting the right set of cards to complete the Quest in the first few turns.

34. Odd Warrior (Odd Control Warrior)- List and Overview

If you play Odd Warrior, most of your opponents will hate you. You may even hate yourself. Matches usually take a long time, usually twice as long as if you were playing any sort of Aggro or Midrange deck, and even outstripping other Control such as Raza Priest or Control Warlock. Your games will be monotonous, and your winrate will probably be very meh, with most wins coming from opponents conceding.

That said, it is an option. It’s often used by bots farming XP, but there are people who actually play it and succeed with it, because it usually crushes Aggro decks that can’t pop off by Turn 4-5.

35. Malygos Druid- List and Overview

Ah, yes. Good old fashioned Malygos Druid. It’s just plain worse than its Celestial Alignment cousin, sees a lot less play, and is just all around a Diet version now… but it is more consistent, and thus sees some play. The idea of the deck is the same as always- survive until you can play out Malygos and burn in one turn. I chose a list that runs just that.

36. Quest Rogue (Caverns Rogue)- List and Overview

Why so low, you may wonder? Simply put, Quest Rogue is too high-roll based for the current Wild meta, which prioritizes consistency. It’s pretty strong at lower levels, where half the matchups are homebrews, but the farther up the ladder you go the worse it gets. Play Quest Rogue against a skilled player with a strong meta deck and it’s a major uphill battle.

Plus, Explosive Runes from Secret Mage hitting an early Bloodsail Flybooter is a harsh loss. Still, ever since the nerfs to The Caverns Below were reverted (the deck was nerfed two to five times, depending on if you count the mechanic change, Secret Passage nerf and/or Crabrider nerf) the deck has been popular. Players are constantly calling for the nerf reversions to be themselves reverted, because it’s simply a one sided pain in the butt- though Flamewaker Mage beats it out in that regard. You’re going to see lots of it in lower ranks, especially early in the season, but probably not higher ranks, because it’s inconsistent.

Well, that’s all for the meta decks! Shoutout to a few of the decks that weren’t quite popular enough to be put on here, such as Exodia Mage, Highlander Hunter, Pillager Rogue (the meme flavor of the week, I believe, like Majordomo Rogue before it), Thief Rogue, and Battlecry Shaman.

EVERYTHING BELOW THIS LIST IS OUTDATED. I’M IN THE PROCESS OF UPDATING.

Now for the meta potential and off meta variant tier list! These decks are, for the most part, entirely viable. They just aren’t on the main tier list because they aren’t as popular. Each one is under a tier that I believe they could wind up in, and then they have a number and a letter next to them. The number corresponds to a deck on the main tier list I think they’re about equal to in power (for example, if the number is 17 I think they’re equal to the 17th best deck on the main tier list- Hyperaggro Druid), and then the letters just distinguish between them, so multiple off-meta decks can be considered equal to the same meta deck.

A- Tier Potential

There’s only one deck here, but it’s a pretty impressive one. I honestly think it could even be A+ Tier, but hey, playing it safe.
1. (13a) Awakened Phoenix Mage (Phoenix Mage)- List and Overview

This deck is, card for card, nearly exactly the same as Waker Mage. In fact, it actually runs Wakers as a backup plan. It isn’t quite as fast as Waker Mage, but when you have two Phoenixes ready to go on board, you can deal 30 damage for just 6 mana (Frostbolt x2 followed by Ice Lance x2)- and with this deck, usually it’ll cost even less due to Mana Flow or Sorcerer’s Apprentice.

So, why run this list over Wakers? Well, first of all, it can win even if it doesn’t find the Wakers. If games go long, it still has a chance to win- and, possibly the biggest draw of the deck, you’re far less likely to lose games on mobile to long animations eating up your turn. It’s even a tad cheaper to build. Honestly, looking at data on Flamewaker post-RSW nerf suggests to me that the meta is turning in favor of Phoenix Mage overall.

B Tier Potential

These decks are all pretty darn good, but have bad matchups against top decks or some other flaw holding them back. They’re all not quite popular enough to make the meta tier list, but honestly, just one new card or some more experimentation could catapult them into the top ranks. Despite how varied they are, they all have one similarity- they’re consistent but also flexible.

2. (19a) Even Mage- List and Overview

Even Mage is a really old archetype that just got what it needed to shine- an upgrade to the Hero Power in Wildfire that turns it into an on demand 1 mana 2 (or even 3) damage ping, a pseudo board clear in Reckless Apprentice, and an amazing payoff in Mordresh Fire Eye.

Personally, I think this is one of the decks that’s on the cusp of greatness- something like a new Manafeeder Panthera-esque card draw could help it immensely.

3. (20a) Even Secret Hunter- List and Overview

This is my favorite deck to play, and it’s also one where I’ve been able to pull an above 60% winrate in top 800 Legend. I’ve hit some ridiculous 70-80% winrates in Gold and Platinum as well- it’s just crazy strong and flexible.

It’s actually more of a Control deck than an Aggro deck- you use the Secrets to prevent your opponent doing anything interesting, and the constant pings from your Hero Power will wear them down quickly. It’s a pretty amazing experience. The list is only 6 cards different from the Aggro Even Hunter, but the difference is pretty crazy. The Secret version, though more difficult to play, is far more flexible and powerful.

4. (22a) Deathrattle Priest- List and Overview

An Aggro deck based around reviving minions with useful (usually damage to opponent’s face) Deathrattles, DR Priest is ridiculously efficient. Games often last only a few minutes, and Highlander decks may as well be free wins- for some strange reason, they really hate when you revive Bad Luck Albatross repeatedly!

B- Tier Potential

5. (27a) Reno Shaman (Shudderwock Shaman, Highlander Shaman)- List (overview pending)

Reno Shaman has recently risen to prominence in a new fashion, using Shudderwock as an all-in-one win condition. With Grumble, Worldshaker, Barista Lynchen, and Zola the Gorgon, you can get the traditional repeating uses of Shudderwock, but the deck runs plenty of disruption and removal Battlecries, and can use Shudderwock to Zephyrs and heal to full with Reno repeatedly.

The deck runs Ice Fishing, alongside the new Firemancer Flurgl/Toxfin combo for a guaranteed 3 mana, 2 card destroy all opposing minions without Divine Shield. It’s a pretty good combo that plays into the deck’s modus operandi of stalling until it can use Shudderwock.

Removal and disruption spells such as Volcano, Hex, Lightning Storm, Tidal Surge, Plague of Murlocs, Devolving Missiles and Devolve allow the deck to stall even more. However, the deck has a hard time if opponents can repeatedly refill board, and it doesn’t do much proactive play until the late game, so it’s lower on the tier list.

6. (29a) Giant Druid (Celestial Alignment Druid, Celestial Giant Druid)- List and Overview

Giants Druid is a deck based around playing Celestial Alignment, then overwhelming the opponent with several Giants (now usually 1 mana because of their discounts). It plays Druid staples of both ramp, such as Overgrowth, and stall, including an Oaken Summons package, to survive long enough to pull off the Alignment.

Faster decks can deal with the Druid before it gets going, and slower decks often take advantage of the Alignment themselves, so the deck’s matchup spread is rather harsh. Despite this, the ability to drop a lethal board of Giants followed by Loatheb to prevent them being cleared is a very strong one, and one that can be pulled off as soon as Turn 7.

7. (29b) Big Shaman (Eureka Shaman)- List and Overview

Big Shaman isn’t a typical Big deck- instead of ramp or mana cheat, it chooses to simply summon its minions, much like Big Priest does with Shadow Essence. Since Ancestor’s Call summons an opposing minion as well, Big Shaman also aims to outvalue its opponent.

It’s a fairly interesting and 100% viable deck, though it has some issues against Aggro.

8. (29c) Nitroboost Kingsbane (Kingsbane Rogue, Nitrobane)- List and Overview

After the Nitroboost nerf, Nitroboost Poison is much worse. Now, it can only be Corrupted if you play Preparation beforehand and then play a non-Spell, or via a full cost Cutting Class/Dread Corsair or Raiding Party.

This has made the card much more clunky, but some Kingsbane lists still choose to use it for burst potential. The list featured is as basic as Nitroboost lists get, and though the deck is slow, it’s an option. Really, though, use Spellsbane or the Pirate Kingsbane lists featured above.

#9 was formerly Exodia Mage, but due to data showing an uptick in both strength and popularity, it’s been moved onto the regular tier list.

C+ Tier Potential

10. (30a) Beast Hunter- List and Overview

Beast Hunter is a hyperaggro deck that aims to uses synergizing Beasts to flood the board and bring the opponent down swiftly. It’s basically Cutelock, but slower in the early game and with draw options.

Master’s Call and Starving Buzzard both make for amazing draw, while Don’t Feed the Animals is, once Corrupted, the source of threat after threat. However, the deck has some issues with being too weak in the early game, and it’s not especially strong due to that. After the Starving Buzzard nerf revert, it seems players are okay with trying it out, and despite its weaknesses it remains fairly popular. It’s also cheap, and can be built for around 3K Dust.

11. (30b) Jade Druid- List and Overview

Jade Druid is a very old archetype that exists mainly due to Jade Idol, which allows for a steady stream of big green men while preventing fatigue. The current lists also run a lot of late-game bombs such as Ultimate Infestation, Ysera Unleashed, and Yogg-Saron, Hope’s End to close out the game.

Unfortunately, though its Armor gain is impressive and its Fatigue immunity makes it one of the best decks for grindy matchups out there, Jade Druid is pretty slow. It has a lot of issues with faster decks despite the amount of removal it runs, and decks such as Secret Mage or Handbuff Paladin can outvalue it in the mid-game and kill it before it gets going.

That said, if you enjoy slower decks, Jade Druid is completely viable, and can be a both fun and challenging deck to play.

12. (30c) Even Warlock (Evenlock)- List (overview pending)

Evenlock is an extremely hyperfocused archetype. Using the one mana Hero Power constantly, it aims to put a lethal board of Giants down as early as Turn 5. The Hero Power naturally advances Mountain, Molten, Frost and Flesh Giants, and so it’s extremely easy to have said lethal board quickly. The deck also runs a few self damage synergies, as well as healing for after self damage, but curiously doesn’t run Darkglare.

The deck is basically Diet Painlock. Everything it does, Painlock does better and more consistently. On top of that, Warlock’s array of Even cards is less than impressive, so it struggles when unable to pull off the Giant board early, leaving it in the dumps. It still has a fairly large following (perhaps players returning to the game from a time when it was more powerful?) and it’s somewhat viable, so it’s worth considering.

13. (30d) Quest Mage (Waygate Mage)- List (overview pending)

Waygate Mage has fallen from an undisputed #1 meta titan to a mediocre off-meta deck in just a few expansions. After the Waygate nerf to make the Quest harder to complete (which was deserved), the meta has developed, while Waygate Mage has only gotten its hands on the stellar Conjure Mana Biscuite and mediocre Arcane Luminary. The Exodia list is still likely the best Quest Mage, but Quest Mage’s goal of playing cheap Giants, using the Quest reward, and getting a free turn to go face with Giants and/or set off Wakers is still attainable.

14. (31a) Odd Hunter- List and Overview

So, Odd Hunter is one of the most difficult decks to pin down a list for. Why? It’s simple- the Hero Power is aggressive, and you can build an aggressive deck around it pretty much however you want. I’ve chosen a version built around Deathrattles, and it’s quite good if it gets rolling. The main issue is getting it going, though, as that requires a good early Undertaker. The deck has most of the materials to be good, but it needs some sort of card to tie it all together- like a 1 mana Beast with a draw Deathrattle or something similar, as it’s just not able to keep up with its own speed and can’t afford to slow down at the moment.

The deck has huge issues with practically every meta deck, as slow decks can often stop the onslaught, while fast decks can often ignore and outtempo it. The deck has good Painlock and Highlander (if you hard mullign for Albatross) matchups, though, which keeps it relevant. After Flare was sent to 1 mana (R.I.P., Even Hunter’s 90-10 Secret Mage matchup), the deck is able to contend with Secrets from decks such as Secret Mage and most aggressive Paladin decks, which essentially makes it an anti-meta deck that’s not good enough to be meta.

15. (31b) Cubelock (Cube Warlock)- List and Overview

Cubelock has been around for a long time. In the current meta, it’s fallen off and become a worse option for slow Warlock players, because Renolock and Control Warlock are just better. Cubelock is incredibly greedy, which is why it’s so hit-or-miss meta to meta, and currently it’s just miss.

That said, it’s a fairly fun and creative deck, and a good player should be able to climb with it, albeit slowly.

16. (32a) Call To Arms Even Paladin- List and overview pending, apologies. After the Crabrider nerf, Call To Arms variants of Even Paladin are about as consistent as glass shards mixed into Jell-O.

Call To Arms Even Paladin is a variant of Even Paladin that utilizes Call To Arms to build more boards, while the steady stream of Silver Hand Recruits slowly chips away at the opponent as well. It’s currently in just as much disarray as Tax Paladin after the Crabrider nerf, so check back later for more.

17. (32b) Odd Shaman- List and overview pending

Much like Call To Arms Even Paladin with Crabrider, Odd Shaman hasn’t gotten its act together since the removal of Wrath of Air Totem from the Hero Power pool. The deck was built around it, after all. Since then, I’ve seen mainly hyperaggro variations utilizing the new Strength Totem’s ability to constantly add more Attack to the board, and they seem decent. However, expect Odd Shaman to drop in the future.

C Tier Potential

18. (33a) Secret Hunter- List and Overview

Secret Hunter is an incredibly speedy archetype that looks to put minions on the board via Petting Zoo, Cat Trick, Rat Trap and Wandering Monster (to be honest, mostly Petting Zoo), and prevent the opponent from doing anything to clear them. Eaglehorn Bow, Kill Command, Dragonbane and Lesser Emerald Spellstone serve as finishers.

Secret Hunter has a lot of potential, but an unfortunate overreliance on drawing into Petting Zoo, Cloaked Huntress, Voracious Reader and Mad Scientist/Phase Stalker early to hit its speed engine, leading it to lose flat out to consistent decks such as those that populate the higher tiers. It’s probably climb capable, but I wouldn’t advise it.

19. (33b) Mech Paladin- List and Overview

Mech Paladin is an incredibly speedy, aggressive deck that banks on dropping Mechs with Magnetic onto each other to the point that the board is too tall for most decks to clear, then finish with a buffed up Flying Machine.

Another top dog in a time long gone, Mech Paladin has fallen off simply due to the fact that it’s too slow. Hand of Ad’al, Knight of Anointment, and Conviction are all playable new tools, but the deck just doesn’t have enough to keep up with the current Aggro decks in the meta (think about the decks in A+ tier if you need an example), while the Control decks often run good enough finishers to 1-for-1 its tall minions. A lack of finishers outside of a good Flying Machine also holds the deck back from greatness. It’s still a really good deck, and could easily slide up the tier list as the meta changes, it just isn’t good enough right now.

20. (33c) Reno Quest Mage (Highlander Quest Mage, Waygate Reno Mage)- List (overview pending)

Reno Quest Mage has always been weaker than plain old Quest Mage, and this meta is no exception. The deck barely has enough ways to activate the Quest, and an extreme importance (you could say overdependence) is placed on Evocation and Mana Cyclone. On top of that, it crumbles against Aggro and it’s super expensive.

That said, it’s a very unique deck and hybridizes two popular decks- Waygate and Reno Mage- so it’s worth a shot if you have the cards. It’ll be difficult to get any real traction with, though.

21. (34a) Crabrider Aggro Druid (Tempo Druid)- List (overview pending)

Formerly the undisputed better of the Aggro Druids, the nerf to Crabrider kind of killed this deck off. It’s only a couple cards different than the Hyperaggro variation, but it’s slower. Crabrider has been cut to a 1-of in the rare event that the variation still sees play and is used as a board control tool (Embiggen means it can realistically bump off two early game minions and survive for 3 mana).

However, the loss of speed makes this variation far worse. Basically, I’m including this variant only because it exists and sees play. If you want to play Aggro Druid, please scroll up to the good list.

22. (34b) Tax Paladin/Rallydin (Tax Pally/Aggro Paladin)- List and Overview

The list for Tax Pally is volatile post-Crabrider nerf. There are two versions- one that’s kind of cut the “Tax” schtick, and one that’s stuck with it and swapped out Crabrider, usually for something like Young Dragonhawk. I honestly can’t speak to which one’s better (I’ve included samples of both lists), but both are mediocre. If you want to be mean, stick with the old fashioned one, and if you want to consistently have a board, go with the “Rallydin” version. I don’t recommend either to climb.

C- Tier Potential (from here on, there’s not a letter/number to correspond to a deck I think the off-meta deck is equal in power to, because there’s no C- Tier or lower on the meta tier list)

23. DMH Warrior (Dead Man’s Hand)- List, overview pending

DMH Warrior is an old and mildly stupid Control deck that aims to outvalue the opponent. The namesake card, Dead Man’s Hand, is a 2 mana spell that shuffles a copy of your hand into your deck. Given that the deck runs a ton of tools for Armor gain and stall, as well as Brann and Coldlight Oracles so the deck can simply shuffle Oracles repeatedly- and yes, you can shuffle a copy of your other DMH as well to go infinite- it’s essentially a weird Control Warrior with a fatigue win condition.

I’m tempted to say run Odd Warrior if you really want to play Control Warrior, but I never want to recommend Odd Warrior. Perhaps try one of the Menagerie or Rush Warriors featured below?

24. Cutlass Rogue (Thief Rogue)- List, overview pending

Cutlass Rogue is, as the name suggests, a deck based around Spectral Cutlass, which can be used infinitely by playing cards from other classes. It’s one of the five Rogue Weapon decks in Wild (not counting Hero Power)- Kingsbane and its variants, Cutlass and its Highlander variant (not featured in this list yet), Self-Sharpening Sword, Hooked Scimitar, and Swinetusk Shank. Cutlass is probably the most interesting of the lost, as its deck revolves around playing subpar cards to swing and heal constantly. Unfortunately, it’s also weak, and though it’s probably the best Thief Rogue deck, it’s just bad in general.

25. Choose One Quest Druid (Choose One Druid)- List, overview pending

Choose One Druid is a variant of Jade Druid. Taking advantage of that Jade Druid usually “floats” mana in early turns, it looks to use those floats to activate the Untapped Potential Quest. From then on, your Choose One cards have all effects.

Due to this, incredibly strong plays are possible, ending with Kun, the Forgotten King, who gives you 10 Armor… for free. On a 7/7 body. However, the deck is less consistent than Jade Druid, and as such falls lower on the tier list.

D Tier Potential (These decks may be capable of posting a 50% or slightly above winrate in the right hands. Thing is, they’re bad, and pretty close to being memes.)

26. Uther Combo Paladin (Uther Paladin, Horsemen Paladin)- List and Overview

This is the exception to the above statement- recently, thanks to Auctionmaster Beardo and the Libram package, decks using the Uther Combo have posted winrates around 52-54%, which is pretty impressive for the deck.

The idea is to play Uther of the Ebon Blade, then play Auctionmaster Beardo next turn, Hero Power, refresh with a spell, and do that 4 times. Bam, the game is won. For those who don’t know, Uther of the Ebon Blade turns your Hero Power into 2 mana: summon a 2/2 Horseman. If you control all 4, destroy the opposing Hero. With the mentioned combo, you can 2TKO (counting the turn you play Uther).

27. Token DH- List and overview pending)

There are many Token DHs running around the lower ranks of Wild, mainly using decks that can be built completely for free with the DH Initiate and Core sets.

However, there are sporadic genuine attempts at creating Token DH, normally with a small Pirate package as well as a Wrathscale Naga combo. I’ll post when I lock one down.

28. Granimals Druid (Guardian Animals Druid, Beast Druid)- List and overview

Though also rare, truly Wild Guardian Animals Druid exist. You’ll see them on occasion, normally in Gold or below. They’re ramp decks, that simply ramp, play Granimals, and hope the opponent can’t counter it. A stupid deck for sure, but one that works against some midrange and can be piloted up the ladder by a skilled enough player.

Off-meta semi-popular deck tier list

These decks are, despite being off-meta, still played with fair frequency. You’re likely to see them on occasion during your ladder climb and they range from bad to fairly strong, so try them out if you’d like and keep them in mind.

Viable (B Tier zone)

  1. Galakrond Rush Warrior (Galakrond Warrior)- List and Overview

Wild Galakrond Warrior is essentially a Rush synergy deck that takes advantage of the crazy buffs from Galakrond, the Unbreakable’s Battlecry alongside Rush to swing the game in a single turn. Taking advantage of the new Conditioning and Rokara, the deck is stronger than ever and capable of beating out a maority of midrange and a smattering of Control and Aggro decks. Basically, the deck can play Aggro or Midrange with a big finisher however it wants, and it will as the matchup demands, making it strong and flexible.

2. Highlander Warrior

Just kidding. A typo led to Highlander Warrior popping up in this spot on my Tier List. It’s not meant to be here, please disregard.

Viable (C+ Tier zone)

3. Flingsbane Control (Flingsbane Rogue)- List and Overview

Normally, Kingsbane is an Aggro or Midrange deck. With the recent nerf reversion to Blade Flurry as well as the new Paralytic Poison and Fogsail Freebooter, a new version has emerged, using Kingsbane to control the board until it can polish off the opponent in just a few turns.

It’s not the strongest deck ever, but it’s fairly interesting and definitely worth a try for Rogue players.

4. Mecha’Thun Warlock- List and Overview

Mecha’Thun Warlock is a combo deck that aims to cheat Mecha’Thun into play with an empty deck (Hemet, Jungle Hunter destroys most of the deck), then play Cataclysm and automatically win the game via Mecha’Thun’s Deathrattle. The new version skips the Dollmaster Dorian/Plot Twist/Bloodbloom/Cataclysm shenanigans for a much more consistent Shadow Hunter Vol’Jin swap between an on-board small minion and Mecha’Thun followed by Cataclysm for the win.

5. Dude Even Paladin (Dude Pally)- List (overview pending)

Dude Even Pally is a variation of Even Paladin that utilizes Silver Hand Recruit synergies as its main game plan. With the Silver Hand Recruit on demand for one mana, it’s easily able to take advantage of them.

Due to lack of data on this deck, my created list is likely unoptimal. There’s room to experiment, so enjoy.

Semi-viable (C Tier zone)

6. Aggro Rush Warrior- List and overview pending

Aggro Rush Warrior is a very similar deck to the Standard version. It’s based around buffing up Rush minions to control the board, then aiming face.

However, in Wild it suffers from simply being too slow, and as such has landed lower on the tier list. It only needs a little push to become good, though, so I believe it’s likely to move up within a year or so.

7. Slower Deathrattle Hunter- List (overview pending)

This variant of Deathrattle Hunter is a slower one that stalls via Deathrattle minions such as Khartut Defender and Teacher’s Pet before summoning copies of Eggs to flood the board. It’s an interesting take on Deathrattle Hunter, but it’s ridiculously matchup-dependent and has issues with Aggro, to the point a lot of Aggro matchups are 70-30 in Aggro’s favor- or worse. To add to its problems, it’s a hard deck to pilot and fairly unique- value focused Deathrattles that use aggressive minions to stall rather than go face are rare.

8. Hadronox Druid (Taunt Druid)- List and Overview pending

Hadronox Druid is an archetype that looks to repeatedly summon dead Taunts via Hadronox and Witching Hour. There are multiple takes for it, including a Big variant and a newer one completely focused on Deathrattles. Due to time constraints, I don’t have a list for it yet.

There’s also a greedier Deathrattle Druid based more on Taunt synergies.

9. Big Spell Mage- List (overview pending)

Big Spell Mage is an older archetype that packs its deck full of expensive spells to take advantage of Arcane Artificer, Dragon’s Fury, and Dragoncaller Alanna. It’s built in a way that prevents it from having much skin in the game before Turn 5-6 (stall followed by bomb after bomb), and it has issues with aggressive decks due to that. Recently, the deck gained Taelan Fordring to consistently draw its best minions- Kalecgos and Dragoncaller Alanna- as well as a new stall tool in Varden Dawngrasp, and that’s all that’s keeping it afloat.

10. Big Ramp Druid- List and overview pending

Big Ramp Druid is a traditional ramp deck using Overgrowth, Jade Blossom, and Breath of Dreams (depending on the list), as well as Lightning Bloom and Innervate to play powerful spells and minions early. Most opponents are unable to deal with, say, 9 and 10 mana minions on turns 5-6, and fold to the giant bodies on board.

Like most late-game payoff decks, Big Ramp Druid has issues with early aggression, as it doesn’t do much until later in the game barring perfect ramp card draws.

There are multiple lists, a Dragons/Breath of Dreams list and one with an Oaken Summons package instead. I don’t have a list yet (stupid mini-set causing time constraints!) but I’ll get one up as soon as I can.

11. Big Warrior- List and Overview pending

Thanks to Commencement and Dimensional Ripper, Warrior has Big Warrior- a deck based around clearing and stalling until able to summon big minions onto the board for lethal. Unlike the majority of Big decks, its minion summoning options are fairly expensive and it doesn’t ramp, so it relies on an extreme Armor gain and removal package to survive and continue with its gameplan. This causes it to fold to any decks that can refill board a couple times, and the deck has especially severe issues with hyperaggro decks such as Hyperaggro Druid or Cutelock. In addition, single-target removal evades it, so Discard Warlock’s Tiny Knight of Evil or a Blessing of Kings buffed Aggro Paladin minion can give it even more trouble.

Playable (D Tier zone)– these decks can still hit a 50% or slightly over winrate, but it’ll take a lot of skill and is fairly unlikely.

12. No Minion Mage (Spell Mage)- List (overview pending)

No Minion Mage in Wild is essentially an inferior Flamewaker Mage. In fact, the lists differ by only about 10 cards. Unfortunately, Wild provides little to speed up No Minion Mage, and it has a lot of trouble with Aggro. Its “payoff” cards, Font of Power and Apexis Blast, are also much weaker than most Wild payoffs, and honestly would be questionable even without the deck restriction. It’s still an option that does well in lower ranks due to its burn capabilities, but is likely to fall off at higher ranks.

13. Deathrattle Demon Hunter (DRDH)- List and Overview Pending

DRDH is a list focused around the new DH cards that summon Deathrattle minions, as well as the new Vengeful Spirit which draws into them. The deck is capable of some quite imposing mid game boards, but quickly falls behind to Aggro without good mulligans. In addition, its late game focus on a few strong cards (Death Speaker Blackthorn, N’Zoth, the Corruptor) is somewhat less consistent than most slow Wild decks, leaving it in an awkward state hinging on good draws to perform well.

14. Thaddius DRDH- List and Overview pending

Thaddius DRDH is a variant of DRDH that aims to repeatedly summon the mighty Thaddius, who is summoned after either Feugen or Stalagg dies while the other has died already that game. Its late game with N’Zoth is improved by this, as getting a pair of 11/11s is an amazing finisher, but it winds up as the slightly weaker of the two DRDHs due to its sacrifice of some early game. DH’s Control options are mediocre at best, and as such a single minded slow DH is doomed to failure, even as awesome as the name Thaddius is.

15. Quest Thief Rogue- List and Overview pending

Quest Thief Rogue is a Thief Rogue deck that takes advantage of Bazaar Burglary’s incredible Hero Power payoff to quickly control the board. However, the Thief Rogue package is subpar in Wild, and the Cutlass is far better. On top of that, Paralytic Poison now exists, rendering Quest Thief Rogue essentially obsolete.

The Quest also “wastes” turn one, putting Quest Thief Rogue a turn behind right from the start. Not that Thief Rogue’s normal Turn Ones (Swashburglar, Hallucination, or Dragon’s Hoard) are impressive, but they’re better than nothing.

16. Majordomo Rogue- List and Overview pending

The idea of Majordomo Rogue is to play a 1/1/1 Majordomo Executus (Anka, the Buried achieves this), hit it with Backstab, and become Ragnaros. Since your Hero is no longer Rogue, Tess Greymane will replay your Rogue cards as well as other classes, including stall such as Evasion, Cloak of Shadows, and Vanish. This is the only major deck besides Odd Warrior to be reliant on stall but not any major wincons as its main course of action, which makes it quite interesting- though not for its opponents.

The deck had a moment of popularity last expansion, but to be frank it’s bad. Really ridiculously bad. Most variants rely on randomly generated cards, sometimes with either Kingsbane or (rarely) Academic Espionage in fatigue to win, so… good luck? If you like decks with no real plan other than one combo, this may be the deck for you.

17. Togwaggle Druid- List (Overview pending)

Togwaggle Druid’s current iteration uses Celestial Alignment to get the combo rolling. It aims to empty its deck with cards such as Nourish, Overflow, and Ultimate Infestation before playing King Togwaggle followed by Azalina Soulthief. This switches your empty deck with the opponent’s, and even if they use Togwaggle’s generated spell to swap back and avoid fatigue, Azalina Soulthief will have created a copy of the spell and you can swap again, leaving you with their deck and them fatigued.

The deck is bad, but hey, it’s cool.

Fully Off-meta Tier List

These decks are still viable or playable, but have slipped under the radar and are only played by a few players. If I ever start seeing them frequently, I won’t be surprised, because they’re still pretty good. Most of them are either difficult to play or just plain weird, though, which is likely why they’re so rare to see.

Unlike most sections, these decks aren’t ranked by their current standing, but instead by how good they’d likely be if players refined them a little bit. Of course, I provide the best lists I can, but frankly, these decks are rare enough that some of them are built based on what my deck tracker sees over just a few games.

If you want where they are right now, you can probably just drop them from + to just the letter, just the letter to -, et cetera.

B+ Tier Potential

  1. APM Priest- List and Overview (possibly guide pending)

So, call me crazy, but by the incredible winrates the players playing this manage (I’ve seen, if I’m remembering correctly, a learning curve where a player was pulling abyssmal sub 40 winrates, then, after learning the deck, started to win almost every game), I think this former meme deck is entirely viable.

Despite problems with disruption, hyper aggro, and some issues with consistency in pulling the loop combo together, one pilot I interviewed has made Legend with the deck. Starting in Rastakhan with Seance, the deck has slowly and steadily gained more tools that have hit critical mass with the release of Rally!

New tools such as Penance and Renew have allowed the deck to heal and have more board control options, while Insight and Thrive In the Shadows allow it to more consistently draw into its combo. Rally! was described by my source as a “godsend for playing around disruptions from Secret Mages and Dirty Rat”, and is apparently the piece that put the deck fully together. In all honesty, I haven’t tested the deck all too much, as it’s just an incredibly difficult deck to even understand.

The main combo is apparently Seance, followed by Vivid Nightmare, followed by Topsy Turvy, Penance, or Holy Smite to kill a Test Subject that has had all of those played on it. That allows you to duplicate a minion on the board and add it back to your hand, without “losing” any cards. Radiant Elemental helps alleviate the mana cost. I’m not sure exactly how that works, but I’ll try and get a full guide up.

The deck wins simply by being able to put down a board of minions every single turn without losing resources.. which is, obviously, quite awesome when it works. It’s a cheap deck, so if you understand it (better than I do, at least), try it out!

B Tier Potential

2. Field Contact Odd Rogue- List and Overview

Field Contact Odd Rogue is an even more aggressive Odd Rogue variant relying on a Field Contact engine instead of Nitroboost to finish up the game. It’s far less likely to gas out than the current Odd Rogue, but slightly less capable of producing an extreme early board and cuts Albatross, weakening its Highlander matchups.

3. Handbuff/Rush Menagerie Warrior- List (Overview pending)

There are two versions of this deck in Wild- one that’s a bit greedy and runs Ironclad and Spiked Wheel to contest the board more, and one that’s entirely focused on a good Ringmaster’s Baton early. By attacking repeatedly with Ringmaster’s Baton, the deck quickly gets a few overstatted minions in play and proceeds to run away with the game. In theory. In reality, you have 2 Batons, 2 Corsair Caches, and, depending on the exact list, a Forge of Souls. If you don’t draw them early enough, the deck has no chance, and the Amalgams you run to fill in any blank slots for Baton or Ringmaster Whatley are kind of useless.

The deck’s main advantage is how consistently it gets going if it has Batons at the ready, as Stage Dive, Town Crier, and a bevy of Rush/Menagerie minions make up the rest of the deck. I believe it has a shot at high tier if it becomes popular due to its ability to contest board focused decks such as Discolock or Odd Paladin alone, not to mention how amazing its ability to keep opponents that focus on curve (such as Pirate Warrior or Murloc Shaman) from getting going.

4. Burn Shaman- List and Overview

Burn Shaman is the most difficult deck to pilot I have ever played. It can be described as Aggro/Combo, which is already a difficult combination to put together. An Aggro deck in some matchups, using its Spell Damage synergies and Burn capabilities alongside Voracious Readers to deal obscene damage every turn, you have to shift to a deck focused on an OTKO with both Phoenixes in others. With both Phoenixes at the ready, 2x Lightning Bolt, 2x Crackle, and a Lava Shock is an 8 mana 30 damage combo at worst. If you get lucky with the Crackles dealing extra damage, you can sometimes ignore the Lava Shock.

Another possible combo with both Phoenixes is to use just the pair of Lightning Bolts and both Totemic Smashes for a 4 mana, 4 card 26 damage from hand combo. Yup, that’s pretty good, even in Wild.

It’s an incredibly good deck against Aggro due to its board clearing capabilities, but also has a good chance against Control and Combo due to the OTKO. Armor gain decks such as slow Warrior and Druid decks give it trouble though, as do Midrange decks and some Highlander cultivars.

From here on, due to the time constraints of the mini set, I don’t have lists, or even explanations for some decks, much less overviews. Please be patient, I do have the lists for most of them, just not time to add them in right now. They’ll be added soon.

B- Tier Potential

5. Greedy Murloc Shaman

Greedy Murloc Shaman is a Murloc Shaman variant that still runs tools such as Gentle Megasaur and Finja, the Flying Star, making it slower than the current popular Murloc decks. It’s still decent based on the strength of its mid game, but less likely to do well in the current speedy meta.

C+ Tier Potential

6. Charge Combo Warrior

Using a combination of Crabrider, Inner Rage, Shield of Honor, Charge, and Bloodsworn Mercenary, Charge Combo Warrior can summon a huge pair of Crabriders with Charge and Windfury and enough attack to kill the opponent in just one turn. It’s pretty incredible and can be done for as little as 9 mana, less if you’ve drawn Crabrider with Corrupted Stage Dive. However, the deck is hyperfocused on the combo and thus loses to Aggro quite often.

7. Even Reno Warlock

Exactly what it sounds like, Even Renolock takes advantage of the Highlander package’s stall capabilities to assemble the Giants. It’s pretty much just worse Renolock.

8. Curve Murloc Paladin

Murloc Paladin not running Alura, Tip the Scales, or Anyfin can happen, this variant is prettyweak and overreliant on drawing into a good curve.

C Tier Potential

9. Aggro DR Hunter

A hyperagressive variant of Deathrattle Hunter based on the newly unnerfed Undertaker, Aggro DR Hunter has flopped. Really badly.

10. Secret Highlander Hunter

An extra aggressive variant of Highlander Hunter chock full of Secrets to play alongside Cloaked Huntress.

11. Alura Murloc Paladin

This Murloc Paladin variant is reminiscent of the pre-Alura nerf Ramp Paladin in standard, using Alura to cast the only spell in the deck- Tip the Scales- and summon a Murloc board. However, lots of Control in Wild can easily deal with that on turn 6-7, so the deck fails to be anything impressive.

C- Tier Potential (descriptions, lists and overviews from this point on are pending)

  1. Malygos Rogue
  2. Secret Paladin
  3. Small Spell Mage
  4. Even Secret Reno Hunter
  5. Odd Mage
  6. Ramp Pally
  7. Totem Shaman
  8. Mechrattle Hunter
  9. Jade Rogue
  10. DR Tempo Rogue

D Tier Potential (I’m aware the numbers are messed up, I’ll fix them soon. Apologies.)

  1. Weapons Rogue (Self-Sharpening Sword or Hooked Scimitar)
  2. Swinetusk Shank Rogue
  3. Soul DH
  4. Shuffle Questlock
  5. Bomb Warrior
  6. Quest Battlecry/Galakrond Shaman
  7. Deathrattle Dragon Rogue

F Tier Potential

  1. Aggro Odd Warrior
  2. Control Shaman
  3. Duel Paladin
  4. Galakrond Priest
  5. Il’Gynoth DH
  6. Star Aligner Druid
  7. Galakrond Rogue
  8. Evolve Shaman
  9. Pure Paladin

Meme decks (playable, maybe 30-40% win rate)

  1. Malygos Shaman
  2. Midrange Druid
  3. Linecracker Druid
  4. Taunt Synergy Druid
  5. Hero Power Mage
  6. Highlander Deathrattle Hunter
  7. Even Rogue

Truly Horrible Meme Decks
Togwaggle Priest
Wall Combo Priest
Weasel Priest

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